Sandy Chin Shares Insights About Mentorship

Sandy holds an MBA from New York University Stern School of Business. She also has a political science degree in Columbia Universities Barnard College.

 

Sandy Chin was the brains behind the Tidal Bore Capital which was launched in 2016. Sandy has risen to be one of the most respected portfolio managers. She has a proven track record of over 20 years. Sandy has actively been involved in the trading of consumer staple stocks. Sandy has built her portfolios over the years by working in various key organizations. She was first a senior analyst in the SAC Capital Management group. Previously, she had been managing funds at the Visium Asset Management. She had also worked at Moore capital where she held the position of a buy-side fund manager.

 

Chin accredits most of her success in portfolio management to her mentor Bill Leach. She says that Bill was instrumental in developing her analytical skill set. In this interview, she talks about her journey in mentorship.

 

Meeting Her Mentor

 

In the interview, Sandy said that she established contact with her mentor when she was hired to join in Bill’s team. At the time, their role was to cover food stocks. Sandy said that she was honored to be the second associate hired by Bill. In her interactions with Bill, she realized that Bill was highly knowledgeable in the stocks field and was one of the top ranking analysts. When Bill saw that Sandy was enthusiastic about learning, he asked her to accompany him to meetings and conferences. Sandy said, that tagging along helped her to really value stocks. Her first lesson was to focus on people. She learned to study body language and management tone. This went a long way in informing her on how to pick stocks.

 

Hardships that her mentor helped her to overcome

 

Sandy said that Bill was instrumental in helping her set up her buy-side venture. This was an overwhelming response and she was now just learning to manage her own sector. Sandy went on to say that Bill helped her to see the forest and the trees as well. Sandy termed this as unusual because most times, mentors focus on long-term goals as opposed to short-term goals such as stock picking and daily analysis. One of the greatest lessons that Sandy learned from her mentor was that she should ask questions as this is one of the best ways to learn and also to build a relationship with your mentor.

 

The influence of Bill on Sandy’s success as a portfolio manager has been pivotal and this emphasizes the need to have a mentorship.

 

 

 

 

 
https://medium.com/@sandychin100

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *